MailChimp and Popup Domination

Following the advice of self-publishing author coach, Tim Grahl, I’m focusing on developing an email list. Tim advises authors to get one of those annoying pop-ups on their site where it asks people to sign up for the email newsletter. The theory is, that though these pop-ups are annoying, they are not annoying enough to make people leave your site or really be too bothered. And the upside is just too big. That upside is getting a healthy email list that allows you to stay in touch with your potential buyers. So, cool. I did it. I bought Popup Domination and set it all up. I also set up MailChimp as the email list manager. Popup Domination  just gets people to sign up, but MailChimp manages the list and lets you actually communicate with your subscribers. I wanted the autoresponder, so I paid for it. $9 for a prepaid option did the trick. You can do it for free, but then you don’t get the autoresponder. Then it’s time to configure these two tools and get them to work together. Not all that intuitive or easy, but there are lots of videos on how to do it on both sites. And, you just test stuff until it all seems to be going OK. I can’t say I’m 100% happy with it all, but it seems to be a good first step.  ...

Using Asana as an Author

Hell yeah, this book is a project. As they say, it’s not about one book, it’s about me setting up a lifelong career as an author. And that’s actually the real project, but for now, I’m focused on making a splash with Quanology: Evolution & You. I’ve got the essay The Gene-ish Self along for the ride as a little sidekick. It was not accepted into the Amazon Kindle Singles program, so I’m making lemonade with it and using it as an additional book to be sold an Amazon. Anyway, I’ve set up an Asana account to manage all the steps a bit better. Sometimes I think half my time is spent making lists of what I have to do. I’m sure that won’t go away, but hopefully using Asana will help. So, Asana is free for teams of up to 15 people. I’m a 1 man team, so no problems there. It lets you create projects, sections, and tasks. It’s all very intuitive and I didn’t have to spend 5 seconds reading any instructions.   Being a self-publishing author means doing everything yourself. To be honest, I like it that way. But since I’m new to all this, a lot of the hard part is determining exactly what to do. For now, this looks like a solid set of tasks. I wish I could share all this with other people, and just as much wish I could see what other authors are up to. Anyway, back to...